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Monthly Archives: April 2015

“Brooklyn band Roosevelt Dime feels ripped from some earlier era with a sound that’s part rollicking blues, part Dixieland. Their songs are catchy toe-tappers, real feel good stuff. A splendid time is guaranteed” - Sing Out! Magazine

“Brooklyn band Roosevelt Dime feels ripped from some earlier era with a sound that’s part rollicking blues, part Dixieland. Their songs are catchy toe-tappers, real feel good stuff. A splendid time is guaranteed” – Sing Out! Magazine

Roosevelt Dime will be heating up the historic main stage at the Earlville Opera House with the first show of the season on Saturday May 2nd at 8 pm. The band represents a melting pot of Americana music combining the blues with the instrumentation of bluegrass, transforming struggle into celebration and taking the joyous beat from sidewalks and streetcars to backrooms and barrooms.

“Inspired by Appalachian string bands, Memphis soul, New Orleans dixieland, and honky tonk harmonies, Roosevelt Dime describe their multi-faceted sound as “Steamboat Soul”…Singing songs born from whiskey and moonshine… with the perfect mix of talent and showmanship to make the audience feel they’re witnessing something special…rhythm and blues, rockabilly, bluegrass and soul…Full of sweet rhymes, finger-picking guitar and a foot-tapping, thigh-slapping rhythm…”

Andrew Green’s banjo is soulful and rhythmic, less claw-hammer and more crawfish boil, dixieland by way of the BQE, and he sings with a New York drawl softened by the rolling hills of Appalachia. Eben Pariser is the gunslinger, with guitar sensibility straight out of Abilene and a voice like a velvet tent revival, perfect for the church of the unrepentant. Underpinning the groove is Tony Montalbano’s laid-back Pacific-meets-Delta percussion, and Craig Akin’s bass, as sweet and complex as Kansas City barbecue.

earlville-NY_rooseveltdime_webRoosevelt Dime Special: Buy pre-sale tickets for any Roosevelt Dime concert and email a screenshot or copy of your receipt to info@rooseveltdimemusic.com. They’ll give you a free digital download of our entire music catalog – four full albums! Sing along in your car, then boogie down at the show.

Take a listen!

YouTube: I Want Mo’, Recorded live at Gypsy Sally’s in DC

YouTube: Down on Your Luck, Recorded live in Rockaway Beach

YouTube: Roosevelt Dime, Recorded Live @ Falcon Ridge Folk Festival 

Roosevelt Dime heats up the stage with their “Steamboat Soul” on May 2nd! Tickets are available online or by calling EOH at $20, $18 EOH members, $15 students. Premium seating applies in the first 4 rows with additional charges of $10 in the front row and $5 in rows b-c-d. The EOH Theater is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.

During your visit, take advantage of the exhibits in the three EOH Art Galleries, the Artisan’s Gift Shop featuring New York artists as well as the homemade desserts in the EOH Arts Café! Delicious refreshments will be available before the show and during intermission, including hot and cold drinks. For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

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The Blue Parlsey Boys

The Blue Parlsey Boys

On Sunday, May 3rd at 3 pm come for a matinee with the Blue Parsley Boys singing a cappella in “Fifty Shades of Blue.” The Blue Parsley Boys are one of the area’s premier a cappella ensembles. The Colgate Inn of Hamilton generously sponsors this performance.

Together since 1998, the Blue Parsley Boys are known for singing familiar and humorous a cappella arrangements. “We’ve taken what used to be an entrée of street-corner barbershop and added a pinch of rock, a dash of spirituals, a dollop of doo-wop and garnished our sound with some Blue Parsley,” said Reg Wilson, one of the group’s high tenors. “Whether your taste is a little old fashioned or more contemporary, you’re going to love a vocal style that we have to say is all our own.”

The group works on an ever-changing book of approximately 100 songs. In the past, this has included fan favorites such as Joyce Eilers’ spiritual “Bound for Jubilee,” “In My Room” by the Beach Boys, a satirical rendition of the story of Noah in “Old Man Noah,” the traditional American folk song “Shenandoah,” the Irish ballad “Danny Boy,” and Billy Joel’s iconic “For the Longest Time.”

Joining Wilson in the Blue Parsley Boys are first tenor Neal Roberts; second tenors Bud Ballinger and Ben Eberhardt; baritones Dan de Noyelles, Christian Vischi and Bruce Ward; basses Dave Lantz and Todd Thomsen. Accompanist Laura Pasquith will be playing the 1893 Chickering Baby Grand.

Don’t miss the Blue Parsley Boys in the amazing acoustics of the 1892 Opera House. Tickets are available online or by calling EOH at $12, $10 EOH members, $7 students. Premium seating applies in the first 4 rows with additional charges of $5. The EOH Theater is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.

During your visit, take advantage of the exhibits in the three EOH Art Galleries, the Artisan’s Gift Shop featuring New York artists as well as the homemade desserts in the EOH Arts Café! Delicious refreshments will be available before the show and during intermission, including hot and cold drinks. For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

Legendary Cajun band BeauSoleil, fiery bluegrass group the Steep Canyon Rangers, country rock greats Chris Hillman & Herb Pedersen, bluegrass icon Peter Rowan, and masterful rock songster John Sebastian are just some of the acts destined to be a part of the Earlville Opera House’s 44th season— one that features the exceptional talents of many rock and roll pioneers! The season kicks off the first weekend in May, with lively fusion of New Orleans Blues with bluegrass instrumentation in Roosevelt Dime, and a Sunday matinee with local a cappella group The Blue Parsley Boys. Tickets are online for all of these shows or call the EOH office at the contact below.

“Brooklyn band Roosevelt Dime feels ripped from some earlier era with a sound that’s part rollicking blues, part Dixieland. Their songs are catchy toe-tappers, real feel good stuff. A splendid time is guaranteed” - Sing Out! Magazine

“Brooklyn band Roosevelt Dime feels ripped from some earlier era with a sound that’s part rollicking blues, part Dixieland. Their songs are catchy toe-tappers, real feel good stuff. A splendid time is guaranteed”
– Sing Out! Magazine

Sat, 5/2 at 8 pm Roosevelt Dime – Blues- Steamboat Soul (Mardi-GRASS)                       

Brooklyn band Roosevelt Dime feels ripped from some earlier era with a sound that’s part rollicking blues, part Dixieland. Their songs are catchy toe-tappers, real feel-good stuff. A splendid time is guaranteed.”- Sing Out! Magazine With a long, cool wail or a hot-and-heavy three part harmony, Roosevelt Dime speaks the language of the Blues. Andrew Green’s banjo is soulful and rhythmic, less claw-hammer and more crawfish boil, dixieland by way of the BQE, and he sings with a New York drawl softened by the rolling hills of Appalachia. Eben Pariser is the gunslinger, with guitar sensibility straight out of Abilene and a voice like a velvet tent revival, perfect for the church of the unrepentant. Underpinning the groove is Tony Montalbano’s laid-back Pacific-meets-Delta percussion, and Craig Akin’s bass, as sweet and complex as Kansas City barbecue. Come feed your musical soul! These guys are straight up high energy, infused with New Orleans swamp-stomp, Appalachian hollow banjo runs, and a little bit of sultry Dixieland swing. And surprisingly, or maybe not, these guys hail from Brooklyn. Their latest release, 2014’s “Full Head of Steam,” caught the attention of Relix Magazine, CMT Edge, Performer Magazine, and more when it climbed to #8 on the national folk charts

Singing

Singing “Fifty Shades of Blue” The Blue Parsley Boys are one of the area’s premier a cappella ensembles.

Sun, 5/3 at 3 pm The Blue Parsley Boys – A Cappella Harmonies                        

The Blue Parsley Boys are one of the area’s premier a cappella ensembles. Together since 1998, the Blue Parsley Boys are known for singing familiar and humorous a cappella arrangements.

The group works on an ever-changing book of approximately 100 songs. In the past, this has included fan favorites such as Joyce Eilers’ spiritual “Bound for Jubilee,” “In My Room” by the Beach Boys, a satirical rendition of the story of Noah in “Old Man Noah,” the traditional American folk song “Shenandoah,” the Irish ballad “Danny Boy,” and Billy Joel’s iconic “For the Longest Time.”

Microsoft Word - 5-30 Voices of Tabernacle flyer.docSat, 5/30 at 1 pm Voices of Tabernacle   – “Say It With Music”                                

The historic 1892 Earlville Opera House welcomes the Voices of Tabernacle with a new program to celebrate the human voice: “Say It With Music” from Around the World.  This year’s program features folk songs and popular songs from different countries.

Directed by Anita Humer the chorus will appear in concert with the Sherburne-Earlville High School Select Chorus, directed by Kylie Davis and featuring Megan Murphy, soprano solist, and Stephen Sabin, cellist.   The performance is a fundraiser for EOH and is sponsored by the Sherburne United Methodist Church.

“Voices of Tabernacle” is a mixed chorus combining adults and students. Members come from Sherburne, Norwich, Hamilton, Lebanon, Madison, Earlville and Waterville. Their annual concert at EOH is an uplifting celebration of the human voice.

Matuto_2013_1-c-VincentSoyez

“The accordion will make you want to throw salt on your hardwood floors and two-step with someone.” – The Examiner

Sat, 5/30 at 8 pm Matuto – Brazilian Folk Meets Appalachia  

Imagine the sound of a Brazilian Carnival in the Appalachian Mountains. A sound where dynamic percussion instruments rumble beneath blues drenched vocals, telecaster twangs, accordion acrobatics, and folksy fiddle tunes.  Matuto moves with two-stepping grace between bluegrass and forró, between swamp rock and maracatu, between surf guitar shimmies and the wah-wah of the berimbau.  They explore styles like forró, xoté, maracatu, and arrasta pé with an in-depth look at the rhythms, melodies, and cultural influences that make up this infectious and universally appealing dance music. 

We first introduced Matuto with a free concert in Hamilton last summer that had everyone dancing! 

Brazilian musical styles like Bossa Nova, Samba, and Choro! The members of Matuto have spent decades mastering the folkloric styles of the Brazilian Northeast, where Rabecas (Brazilian Fiddle), Accordions, and polyrhythmic percussion instruments reign supreme.

Enjoy lower ticket prices for these amazing artists  made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support for the National Endowment for the Arts!

TIME OUT NEW YORK “Martha Redbone is a charismatic indie-soul diva whose sound is a just-right mix of retro and modern”

Sat 6/13 8 pm Martha Redbone Roots Project – Blues                              

Miss Redbone’s music flows equally from her own unique, award-winning blend of Native American elements with funk and her deep roots in Appalachian folk and Piedmont blues. “A truly hypnotic and eloquent roots Americana exploration. The Garden of Love: Songs of William Blake beautifully and unexpectedly matches two powerful voices; two centuries, continents, and cultures apart. The mastermind is Martha Redbone, an Independent Music Award winner renowned for blending Native American vibes from her Cherokee and Choctaw background with R&B grooves, blues and dashes of Appalachian folk.” Allmusic.com   The Roots Project will be a quartet for this concert including piano, guitar, bass and vocals.

“Once in a blue moon an album comes along out of nowhere that starts by giving you goosebumps and ends by knocking you completely off your feet. This is one such album. In terms of quality and soulfulness it eclipses everything else I’ve heard this year. BLUES AND SOUL

Enjoy lower ticket prices for these amazing artists thanks to a grant from The New York State Presenters Network Presenter-Artist Partnership Project!!

Their recordings and dynamic live performances have earned them many accolades, including Grammy and IBMA Awards, but most important, is the devotion of their fans. The Steep Canyon Rangers are Woody Platt (guitar), Graham Sharp (banjo), Charles Humphrey (bass), Mike Guggino (mandolin), Nicky Sanders (fiddle) and Mike Ashworth (box kit).

Their recordings and dynamic live performances have earned them many accolades, including Grammy and IBMA Awards, but most important, is the devotion of their fans. The Steep Canyon Rangers are Woody Platt (guitar), Graham Sharp (banjo), Charles Humphrey (bass), Mike Guggino (mandolin), Nicky Sanders (fiddle) and Mike Ashworth (box kit).

Sunday 6/28 8 pm Steep Canyon Rangers – Rollicking, Grammy-winning Bluegrass               

The Steep Canyon Rangers have been among the nation’s most celebrated bluegrass acts ever since they started touring with Steve Martin. Since then, the buzz surrounding the lively, highly entertaining sextet has endured long past the glitz that came with Martin’s affiliation. The band netted the International Bluegrass Association’s award for Entertainer of the Year (in 2011, with Steve Martin), and even a Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album in 2013.

Their work as Steve Martin’s backup band has “introduced them to a national, and non-bluegrass, audience and earned them a Grammy…with Martin on his Rare Bird Alert album, to which they also contributed three songs. On their Rounder debut, the band continue to challenge their fans with tunes that show off their growing playing and songwriting skills. They’re still a bluegrass band, but most of the songs here have a feel that owes as much to pop, folk, and singer/songwriter impulses as they do to bluegrass. They break out of the usual melodic structures of bluegrass for something that’s between newgrass and pop.Allmusic.com

“Canada’s premier neo-tradsters romp from world-beat to blues, urban-pop to old-timey, with wild-eyed invention, haunting traditionalism, and spine-rattling groove.” —The Boston Globe

“Canada’s premier neo-tradsters romp from world-beat to blues, urban-pop to old-timey, with wild-eyed invention, haunting traditionalism, and spine-rattling groove.” —The Boston Globe

Sunday 7/12 8 pm The Duhks – Captivating Folk Fusion                                               

“The Duhks (pronounced “ducks”)…plays a sometimes high-energy blend of Appalachian old-time string band, Irish fiddle tunes, and kick-ass rock/folk fusion. Other times they are playing delicate finger-picked traditional instrumentals.”
Acousticmusic.come/FAME

Last year, The Duhks released their first studio album since reuniting with their powerful original vocalist Jessee Havey. The record, entitled Beyond the Blue, is representative of their characteristic eclectic mix of Celtic, Cajun, gospel, and even some Latin-inspired percussion. The group, which hails from Winnipeg, Manitoba, has put itself squarely back on the map with what roots music magazine Engine 145 calls a “more electric” exploration that sometimes features “lap steel, a full drum kit, and even a horn section scattered throughout the album.” Personnel-wise, The Duhks have fleshed things out, adding Québécois multi-instrumentalist Colin Savoie-Levac on guitar, as well as Swedish fiddling phenom Anna Lindblad on violin, plus Podolak on banjo, Havey on vocals, and Kevin Garcia on percussion.

Putting it Together logo 2 p with figures green

Chris Bord returns to direct another musical at the EOH this summer! More soon about auditions etc.

Steven Sondheim’s “Putting It Together”: Friday & Saturday, July 24-July 25 at 8 pm & Sunday, July 26 a 3pm matinee!

“Putting it Together” is a musical revue set in an all-night, black-tie party in a penthouse. The hosts are an older couple that face their disillusions and marital troubles, while a younger, less jaundiced couple struggle with their feelings and desires, and a commentator oversees and influences the action. The spouses deal with infidelity and divorce but finally reconcile before dawn.

Sondheim is the winner of an Academy Award, eight Tony Awards (more than any other composer) including the Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre, eight Grammy Awards, a Pulitzer Prize and the Laurence Olivier Award. His most famous works include (as composer and lyricist) A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Sunday in the Park with George and Into the Woods. He also wrote the lyrics for West Side Story and Gypsy.

circus crop 5128 p

What kid can resist being the star of the show!

EOH Circus Mon-Fri, July 27-July 31 9am-3pm with EOH Circus Show on Friday, 7/31 at 7 pm

Join us for the culmination of a week of fun and merriment in a zany, crazy evening of circus fun for the whole family. Every kid who dreamed of being a star has a chance to shine in this wonderful performance where all the circus skills come together after an intensive week of fun!

Led by Jen Taylor of OM-Fly Circus who the fundamentals of putting on a circus with teamwork and tapping inner creativity.

Last year's Irish Music Award Winners for Top Traditional Band, the six talented musicians  of FullSet are full of energy and innovation.

“The blazing energy they possess is matched with confident instrumental skill and imaginative outcome. You will have gathered from this that Fullset is a thoughtful creative and imaginative outfit – they are but there’s enough spit and vinegar in their music to balance the studied atmospherics.” Irish Music Magazine

Saturday 8/8 pm FullSet – Award-winning Irish Traditional       

FullSet continues to stack up the honors winning Best Traditional Band in the 2014 in the Live Ireland Music Awards following their New Group of the Year in 2012. That same year they won, Best New Band in the Irish American News Music Awards. Six talented musicians full of energy and innovation make up the band. Michael Harrison of Tipperary is the grandson of Irish fiddler Aggie Whyte, and a three-time All-Ireland fiddle champion with his smooth and free flowing style of fiddle. Martino Vacca is an exceptional uilleann piper and employs his mastery of this instrument in intricate arrangements. Janine Redmond of Dublin plays the button accordion, and has solo All-Ireland titles to her credit. Eamonn Moloney on bodhrán and Andy Meaney on guitar, effortlessly blend the music together with a sensitive yet driving accompaniment. The emotive singing style of Teresa Horgan completes the ensemble with her lovely voice and with the flute.

Director of Irish Studies, Traolach O’Riordain sums it up: “There are two kinds of musicians in Ireland…You have those who learn the traditional music in school, and those who learn it from their parents and grandparents, just as they learned it from their parents and grandparents before them, all the way back to the time God was a small boy. FullSet falls into the latter category.”

Chris Hillman and Herb Pederson are two quietly monumental figures of an era of American music

Chris Hillman and Herb Pederson are two quietly monumental figures of an era of American music

Fri 8/14 8 pm Chris Hillman & Herb Pedersen – Two Americana Icons                            

The two country rock pioneers take the EOH main stage to explore the back roads of Americana music. Hillman’s excellent guitar and mandolin technique blend beautifully with the hillbilly flavors provided by Pedersen’s fiery banjo picking. Chris Hillman and Herb Pederson are two quietly monumental figures of an era of American music – guys who played alongside Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, J.D. Souther, Neil Young, Richie Furay, Stephen Stills, Dan Fogelberg, Timothy B. Schmit, and Al Perkins as young guns, then went on to found the Desert Rose Band. Chris Hillman’s won a place in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Arguably the pioneer of the genre know as “Country Rock,” Chris Hillman has carved a permanent niche in the history of contemporary American music with such notable bands as The Byrds, The Flying Burrito Brothers and the Desert Rose Band.

Herb Pedersen began his career in Berkeley, California in the early 60’s playing 5 string banjo and acoustic guitar with people like David Grisman, Butch Waller, David Nelson, and Jerry Garcia. His recording discography is like a who’s who of the singer/songwriter scene. Don’t miss these American icons!

Fri 8/21 8 pm Beausoleil – Legendary Cajun Fusion 

“The best Cajun band in the world.” -- Garrison Keillor, host of NPR's

“The best Cajun band in the world.” — Garrison Keillor, host of NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion.”

The best Cajun band in the world.” — Garrison Keillor, host of NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion.” The band has brought Cajun music to new heights and they were the very first Cajun group to ever win a GRAMMY!

Their most recent release From Bamako to Carencro is a culture-crossing release designed to highlight the connections between Bamako, Mali, in West Africa, and the kind of music made in Lafayette, LA, suburbs like Carencro. “After 37 years as globe-trotting Cajun ambassadors, there are not many unconquered frontiers left for BeauSoleil. Caribbean/world music has a strong presence here on its 25th album, though it’s not necessarily new ground…But what’s astounding is how familiar ground can be revisited and still sound remarkably fresh. A good portion of the proceedings sweep through a worldwide Creole odyssey …The arrangements are beyond the traditional dancehall-centric variety but are more string-band, world music-oriented…Cajun musicians have always fused outside styles and influences into the repertoire and made ‘em their own.” Offbeat

8-31 Eilen_Jewell band

“With a burnished voice lingering somewhere between Billie Holiday and Neko Case, Eilen Jewell’s aching vocals are pure, country-gospel, box-car soul.” – My Old Kentucky Blog

Sat 9/12 8pm Eilen Jewell – Smooth, Smoky Blues    

Eilen Jewell and her red-hot Americana band make their way to the historic Earlville Opera House main stage this fall.  Where is Eilen Jewell in the fast growing Americana realm? SavingCountryMusic.com says it best: “…she bridges many elements of American music: country, swing, jazz, rockabilly, by not taking those older art forms and melding them together, but traveling back to a time when all these specifics genres were still forming, and the differences between them were still relatively obscure.”

She is starting a new chapter with a new album arriving May 26, Sundown Over Ghost Town. For the project the evocative singer-songwriter draws on her experiences of welcoming her first child, Mavis, and moving from Boston back to Idaho, where she’s from. Her previous release made her many Opera House fans! “Queen of the Minor Key, draws on everything from classic country to early R&B, with an emphasis on sounds from the seamier side of the tracks. With dirty sax riffs and low-slung guitars, the instrumentals that bookend the album evoke the bump-and-grind exotica of vintage Southern California suburban saloons. Yet on the flipside, Jewell imbues slow, jazzy numbers like “I Remember You” and “Only One” with torch and tenacity that linger long past last call. Eilen Jewell is the Queen of the Minor Key. Sad songs are her wealth and finery.” (Signature Sounds)

“One of the top bluegrass singer-songwriters of his generation.” – Terry Gross, NPR's Fresh Air.

“One of the top bluegrass singer-songwriters of his generation.” – Terry Gross, NPR’s Fresh Air.

Sat 9/19 8pm Peter Rowan – Grammy winning Folk-Bluegrass Icon                                Sound <))

Grammy-award winner and six-time Grammy nominee, Peter Rowan is a singer-songwriter with a career spanning over five decades. “A major cult figure among progressive bluegrass aficionados, Peter Rowan participated in a number of adventurous projects in the late ’60s and ’70s before embarking on a highly productive solo career. Primarily a guitarist, Rowan also sang, yodeled, and played various members of the mandolin family.” AllMusic.com From his early years playing under the tutelage of bluegrass veteran Bill Monroe, to his time in Old & In the Way and breakout as a solo musician and bandleader, Rowan has built a devoted, international fan base through a solid stream of records, collaborative projects and constant touring.

Fri 10/2 8pm John Sebastian and David Grisman – Legends of American Music         

These two Americana icons' history dates back to the Greenwich Village folk revival, and encompasses everything from bluegrass to The Lovin' Spoonful to Woodstock to jazz to blues and back again.

These two Americana icons’ history dates back to the Greenwich Village folk revival, and encompasses everything from bluegrass to The Lovin’ Spoonful to Woodstock to jazz to blues and back again.

David Grisman and John Sebastian met over 50 years ago in The Even Dozen Jug Band in 1964. After that, both of them became legends in their genres. David Grisman is normally associated with the bluegrass wing of country music, but his music owes almost as much to jazz as it does to traditional American folk influences. Because he couldn’t think of what to call his unique, highly intricate, harmonically advanced hybrid of acoustic bluegrass, folk, and jazz without leaning toward one idiom or another, he offhandedly decided to call it “dawg music” — a name that curiously enough, has stuck. John Sebastian has had a varied career as a singer, songwriter, and musician. As the leader of the folk-rock band the Lovin’ Spoonful, he was responsible for a string of Top Ten hits in 1965-1967 that included the chart-toppers “Daydream” and “Summer in the City,” and he returned to number one in 1976 as a solo artist with “Welcome Back.” He wrote or co-wrote those hits as well as many others, along with songs used on Broadway and in the movies. As part of the Lovin’ Spoonful, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. Together, they recorded Satisfied in 2007. The album offers a collection of traditional folk songs, mixed with originals by both Sebastian and Grisman.

Apart from live musical events, EOH’s season will be filled with lively gallery openings, creative and informative workshops, and family-friendly events like our EOH Circus, which runs July 27th-31st. The Opera House has three art galleries open to the public during business hours, which are Tuesday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm. For more information, www.earlvilleoperahouse.com or call 315-691-3550. 

Call us about volunteering if you’d like to help make all of this happen!

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

McCue’s affection for this pre-rock music is evident in the disc’s gorgeously crafted songs; they sound so authentically vintage that you’ll be checking the credits to see what Tin Pan Alley tunesmith wrote them.

McCue’s affection for this pre-rock music is evident in the disc’s gorgeously crafted songs; they sound so authentically vintage that you’ll be checking the credits to see what Tin Pan Alley tunesmith wrote them.

The Earlville Opera House welcomes the Anne McCue Band on Friday, April 17th at 8 pm to the EOH Arts Cafe with swinging Americana blues. Anne McCue is touring in support of her February release, Blue Sky Thinkin’.

Billboard said of the blues artist: “Anne McCue is the virtual definition of “triple threat.” A potent singer, thoughtful songwriter and tough guitarist, she completely comes into her own on this new project.”  Blue Sky Thinkin’ is her sixth studio album and is a throwback to swing-era blues. Though the songs are all originals, they capture the warmth and tone of the guitar greats of days gone by. Blue Sky Thinkin’ is a departure for Anne McCue who has a deep feeling for the rocking side of the blues.   McCue’s affection for this pre-rock music is evident in the disc’s gorgeously crafted songs; they sound so authentically vintage that you’ll be checking the credits to see what Tin Pan Alley tunesmith wrote them

Anne McCue is the real deal. Influenced by everyone from Django Reinhardt to Howlin’ Wolf to Bessie Smith, the Australian songstress invites comparisons to Lucinda Williams, sure, but also to harder-edged folk like Janis Joplin and even Jimi Hendrix. She made her U.S. debut of sorts touring with her band Eden AKA at the Lilith Fair in 1998 and 1999.

On stage, she’s captivating. There’s something undeniably sultry about a woman with an electric guitar, and she’s known to show up with a fully loaded arsenal of axes– everything from a shiny National to a burgeoning 12-string to a lap steel– and she works them all totally masterfully during the course of her show.

Take a listen:

Cowgirl Blues

Things You Left Out in the Rain

Little White Cat

Join us for an evening with the axe-wielding Anne McCue and band as they swing back to our Americana roots this Friday, April 17th! Seating is limited. Admission is $22 and $20 for EOH members and students are discounted to $17. The Earlville Opera House is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift. Don’t forget to visit our Artisan’s Gift Shop featuring over 35 regional artists with jewelry to blown glass to pottery. The EOH Arts Café will open one hour before the performance and serves tasty desserts and hot coffee/tea.

For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

More about Anne McCue:  http://www.annemccue.com/about.htm

Here’s what people are saying…

“These days, there are very few women working the same territory as McCue who can combine tough and vulnerable. That she does it with poise and a self-deprecating sense of humor makes her an artist worth seeing again.” -Jim Caligiuri, Austin Chronicle

“Listeners will delight in her slide guitar prowess, as well as her pointed and powerful lyrics.” -Seattle Post Intelligencer

“Initially, her stunning voice hooked me in. Then I got inside the songs. The first chance I got, I went to see her perform . . . I was floored!” — Lucinda Williams, alt-country icon

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

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Tony Thompson

Tony Thompson

Tony Thompson is an emerging artist with a unique vision, an unusual history, and a back-story that would have derailed most young artists. Now residing in Utica, Tony Thompson was born in Lynchburg, VA, and raised in Syracuse.   The classroom in his early years was a source of anxiety, and to escape this discomfort, he began to draw.   Drawing became a way to express thoughts and feelings that could not find their way into words. On his way to school every day, he passed graffiti and artwork created by the Syracuse street artists scene. Its influence eventually found its way into his drawings.

Today his work usually involves combinations of screen-printing, spray paint, and paint marker. The early influences and themes of his work can be seen in his surreal urban imagery, which often contains spray paint cans and caps as a totem of respect for his background in graffiti – a reminder of the path less chosen that worked for him. Relatively new to the gallery scene, Thompson is a young man on the cutting edge of artistic expression, someone very aware of his journey and its context, whose art pays homage to that path and others still traveling it.

The Earlville Galleries are pleased to show the exciting work of Tony Thompson in the Arts Café Gallery through May 9. Titled “Cloud Physics,” the exhibit chronicles his fascination with and depiction of clouds over the years, from his street art days to the present. “As a symbol, I have always used the cloud as content or a tool, but never as a focal point. This show focuses on the symbol of the cloud.”  Here’s Tony creating one of the pieces in the current exhibition: Cities Tears:

“It’s kind of amazing at how well Tony’s theme interfaces with our other exhibition, “Changing Landscapes” that uses landscape as a means to start a conversation about climate change,” says EOH director Patti Lockwood-Blais. “Clouds and Climate Change at the same time, what serendipity!”

Also on display in the galleries: TeensART 2015 featuring artwork from eleven schools and “Changing Landscapes” featuring the artwork of seven upstate women artists.

Check out the photo blog by Steve Nyland: great pics!

Admission is free. The Opera House is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.   For more information, visit www.earlvilleoperahouse.com or call 315-691-3550. Gallery hours are 10-5 Tuesday-Friday and 12-3 on Saturdays.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

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