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Over 100 people attended the opening of the exhibits on September 12.

Over 100 people attended the opening on September 12.

Rebecca Murtaugh wants your curiosity. The Philadelphia-born artist, whose show “Constructed Contemplations” is at the Earlville Opera House through October 31st, wants viewers to walk by the 3-D squares and rectangles she’s created and wonder, why? What? She wants them to note the richly textured, almost lichened surface of the objects, and understand that they have an inside and an outside just like the human body. She wants viewers drawn to the bright, opaque colors she chooses—colors that are often used in the names of her pieces.

“Colors have names that fit their characters,” Murtaugh says, and she happily combines those characters and repurposes them as titles, adding a layer of meaning, poetry, and sometimes, humor.

“Fusion and Radish,” a recent example, is a link-shaped hollow rectangle nearly six feet tall. The bumpy outside wears a mantle of vivid chartreuse, “Fusion,” while the inside is painted “Radish” red. The paint comes from Home Depot—the store’s mistints are Murtaugh’s goldmine—and represent another way Murtaugh incorporates a level of eco-sensibility to her process. She’s used everything from scrap wood to found objects to branches from her backyard as the foundation for her pieces. “I want the viewer to be inquisitive and to have a sense of wonder,” she says.

Murtaugh’s process is rooted solidly in spontaneity and artistic “play,” but it draws on elements of ceramics, chemistry, and even the science of nutrition, which was Murtaugh’s first major academic pursuit. Indeed, the bright hues she chooses could come directly from a McGraw-Hill biology textbook. But these days, Murtaugh, who teaches art at Hamilton College, says her inspiration comes from anywhere. “I don’t stifle my process in the studio,” she says. “If something is interesting I’ll pursue it.”

Works by artists Vartan Poghosian and Andrea Deschambeault-Porter will also be on exhibit at EOH during this time. For more information call 315-691-3550 or visit http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

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Earlville native Sherry Haluska had a pretty good weekend. She had returned to her old stomping ground from her current home in Schenectady on the weekend of August 14th to attend her fiftieth high school reunion, to take in the summer quilt show at the Earlville Opera House, and to attend the performance of Chris Hillman & Herb Pedersen in the restored upstairs theater on Friday night. While there, she entered our annual raffle. And she pulled first prize! “I enjoyed my first visit to the opera house,” notes Haluska. “Winning the raffle is definitely the icing on the cake!”

Haluska, a retired librarian, had her choice among the three possible raffle prizes available, and she chose the three-pack of restaurant gift certificates: $100 each to the Tailor & the Cook in Utica, Michael’s in Waterville, and The Horned Dorset in Leonardsville. “It will be lovely to share meals with friends in the area,” offers Haluska.

The second place raffle prize went to EOH Board Member Bruce Ward, who graciously deferred to the third place winner, Kristin Mosher of Syracuse. Deciding between the Bose Soundlink Mini speaker and tickets for the full 2016 EOH Season, Mosher chose the “awesome” speaker. “We will definitely continue supporting the Earlville Opera House,” said Mosher. “Thanks for all your work providing such amazing art, culture, and entertainment.”

The Earlville Opera House is deeply grateful to everyone who helped support our youth programming by purchasing a raffle ticket this season, and to the restaurants that generously donated prizes.

EOH Auction logo copyYou are invited to join your friends and neighbors and fellow patrons of the arts on Friday, October 16th at the Colgate Inn for a silent auction to benefit the Opera House. Enjoy complimentary wine, beer and hors d’oeuvres generously provided by the Colgate Inn, listen to the incomparable piano stylings of Tony award-winning Dianne Adams McDowell, and bid on artwork, local crafts, food, trips, antiques, and services from babysitting to legal counsel, all donated by friends of the Opera House.

For more than 40 years, Earlville Opera House has been a mecca for arts and entertainment in rural central New York. Housed in a restored, historic, late-19th-century structure on Main Street in the Village of Earlville, the Opera House offers classes for children and adults; exhibits the work of local, regional and national artists; and stages performances ranging from community theater to nationally renowned musicians.

There is over $11,000 in auction items to bid on this year!! Here are some sample items to fire your enthusiasm:
· Golf for four from Seven Oaks Golf Course (including cart!)
· Portrait photography session from Vantine Imaging
· Family four-pack of zoo entry tickets from the Rosamond Gifford Zoo
· Four tickets to the Claire Lynch Band holiday concert
· Private screening of a film of your choice from Hamilton Movie Theater
…and much, much more!

Listen to the incomparable piano stylings of Tony award-winning Dianne McDowell

Listen to the incomparable piano stylings of Tony award-winning Dianne McDowell

Fabulous gift certificates to local businesses include the Scotch n’ Sirloin, The Dark Horse, Lakeview Restaurant, Fojo Beans, Jewett’s Cheese House, Ray Brothers BBQ, and Curtis Lumber and more.

Idle and abandoned for more than two decades before it was saved from demolition in 1971, the Opera House has been rehabilitated and sustained through volunteer effort and the generosity of EOH members and friends. This support has enabled it to become a beacon for the arts in our community.

Mark your calendar for Friday, October 16th, 5:00-7:30 pm. Admission is $18, and you’ll be fostering the arts in central New York.  Here’s a link to pictures from last year’s auction!

{Edibles} – These delectable edibles offer a taste of our local food culture. Choose from a variety of restaurant dining experiences, locally produced meats, cheeses, syrups and beverages for a true taste of Central New York!

{Experiences} – Maybe these items aren’t on your “Bucket List” but there’s sure to be at least one that you’ve always wanted to do… see a bit of Central New York by air or water, engage in a culinary adventure, visit a museum, explore the zoo or spend the day on the links.

{Entertainment} – Whether your idea of enjoyment is a special night at the movies with a bunch of your besties, a unique house party with live musicians, or an evening of contemporary dance, get your party hat on and pick from a great selection of fun and merriment.

{Essentials} – Far more than “the basics,” these fundamentals give you just what you need: choose from legal advice, massages for wellness, architectural consultation, fitness training, and more!

{Embellishments} – Items ranging from the beautiful to the truly unique to adorn your home or office. Select from antiques, fine art and photography, pottery, garden decor, and other original embellishments!

Tickets available through our online donation page, Please put Auction in the message box. https://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/donate.form or at: Evergreen Gallery, 11 Lebanon St., Hamilton or via the Earlville Opera House through 315-691-3550 or by seeing one of our board members Roger Bauman, Suzanne Collins, RuthAnn Loveless, Dode Page, Lara Scott, Jonathan Vaughn, Merle Vonwettberg, Bruce Ward, Shirley Zimmer, Diane Fenton, or Ted O’Bryan.  We’ll also have tickets at the door at the Colgate Inn on Friday night.

These two Americana icons' history dates back to the Greenwich Village folk revival, and encompasses everything from bluegrass to The Lovin' Spoonful to Woodstock to jazz to blues and back again.

These two Americana icons’ history dates back to the Greenwich Village folk revival, and encompasses everything from bluegrass to The Lovin’ Spoonful to Woodstock to jazz to blues and back again.

On Friday, October 2nd, Legendary Lovin’ Spoonful songsmith John Sebastian, who’s famous for songs: Do you Believe in Magic?, Daydream, Summer in the City, Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind?, Nashville Cats will perform a sold-out show with virtuoso mandolinist and roots music avant-garde artist David Grisman at the Earlville Opera House. Together the two pros will swap songs, licks, and stories of one of the most happening eras of American popular music. This performance is generously sponsored by WAER 88.3 Syracuse Public Media.

Sebastian and Grisman got their start as part of the Even Dozen Jug Band as part of the 1960s Greenwich Village scene, but soon parted ways. Grisman hooked up with guitarist Peter Rowan, gaining fame as part of the bluegrass jam outfit Old and In the Way before founding the jazzy, forward-thinking David Grisman Quintet (DGQ) in 1977. Meanwhile, Sebastian made rock n’ roll history with The Lovin’ Spoonful, sending seven songs into the Top 10 in just two years. Leaving the band in 1968, Sebastian found success as a Broadway composer, and appeared at Woodstock before releasing three original albums, one of which contained Welcome Back, which became the theme song for the ABC sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Sebastian and the rest of the Spoonful were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000.

In 2007, Sebastian and Grisman came together to release Satisfied, a stripped-down, one-take affair that sounds very much like two long-time collaborators and old pros sitting on a front porch trading licks. Grisman’s mandolin, and Sebastian’s downright evocative harmonica work twine effortlessly around traditional standards and original compositions alike.

For more information about upcoming EOH events, call 315-691-3550 or go online at www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

Please note if you have your tickets to the show,  the historic theater doesn’t have a heating system so please dress for autumn…even though over time our 300 bodies will definitely create enough heat so that it will be fairly warm.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

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