Earlville Galleries: Art To Make You See Differently

Eloisa Guanlao's Darwin's Finches

Eloisa Guanlao’s Darwin’s Finches

The Earlville Galleries are pleased to present the work of two remarkable women artists who ask us to look deeper and think about what we’re seeing.

Eloisa Guanlao asks, “What does it mean to wildlife when technological innovations continue unabated and unquestioned?” Her work in the East Gallery focuses on the effect of electronic and radio interference on bird magnetoconception, a sense that allows birds and other animals to detect the Earth’s magnetic field to perceive direction, altitude, or location in order to develop regional maps. Her goal is to decelerate our rapid over-reliance on technology by compelling deliberate meditation upon technology’s benefits and downfalls on the circadian rhythm of all living species.

From Judith Present's On The Curve: Wolves and Peckers

From Judith Present’s On The Curve: Wolves and Peckers

Judith Present’s digital photography in the Arts Café Gallery deals with the deviation of the straight line to create movement from stagnation, to transform still images into dance by using curves, flow, and repetition. Present explains, “The beauty of working with digital photographs is that one can take a blank canvas on the computer and create just about anything, true or untrue, unlike capturing reality. Photographs used to be what the eye sees; now they can be what the eye can dream up and manipulate.”

Guanlao received her MFA in studio art from the University of New Mexico, and has exhibited in Maryland, California, Michigan, Florida, New Mexico, New Jersey, and New York. Artist’s website: www.eloisaguanlao.com.

Present’s work utilizes her background in fashion photography, textile design and theater. Currently based in Pennsylvania, she has exhibited in New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Montana. More about this artist at More about this artist at http://www.flickr.com/photos/presentarts

In the West Gallery, the 12th Annual TeensART Exhibit will celebrate the artwork of over 250 young artists throughout the Central New York community. Curated by art teachers from ten area schools, the gallery walls come alive with the amazing creativity of young artists. This exhibit is generously sponsored again this year by Tom Morris, DMD, of Family Dentistry in Norwich.

A reception for the artists will be held on Saturday, March 19, from 12-3 pm. The exhibits run through April 30. Gallery hours are 10-5 Tuesday-Friday and 12-3 on Saturdays. Admission is free, and the Galleries are wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift. For more information, call 315-691-3550 or visit http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Earlville Galleries are located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

Exhibits are made possible, in part, with public funds from the NYS Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

The wet collodion glass ambrotypes capture images of “stuffed” birds endemic to the southeast region of the United States which, as a cultural material form, compel deliberate meditation upon the benefits and pitfalls of technology on the circadian rhythm of living species. They are housed in stylized view cameras, harkening to the early days of field photography. The ambrotypes of “stuffed” birds perch as poignant, but pale souvenirs of real birds migrating over real places.

The wet collodion glass ambrotypes capture images of “stuffed” birds endemic to the southeast region of the United States which, as a cultural material form, compel deliberate meditation upon the benefits and pitfalls of technology on the circadian rhythm of living species. They are housed in stylized view cameras, harkening to the early days of field photography. The ambrotypes of “stuffed” birds perch as poignant, but pale souvenirs of real birds migrating over real places. (Eloisa Guanlao)

This series deals with the deviation of the straight line to create movement from stagnation. Using curves and their flow, images are transformed into dance.

This series deals with the deviation of the straight line to create movement from stagnation. Using curves and their flow, images are transformed into dance. (Judith Present)

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