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Eloisa Guanlao's Darwin's Finches

Eloisa Guanlao’s Darwin’s Finches

The Earlville Galleries are pleased to present the work of two remarkable women artists who ask us to look deeper and think about what we’re seeing.

Eloisa Guanlao asks, “What does it mean to wildlife when technological innovations continue unabated and unquestioned?” Her work in the East Gallery focuses on the effect of electronic and radio interference on bird magnetoconception, a sense that allows birds and other animals to detect the Earth’s magnetic field to perceive direction, altitude, or location in order to develop regional maps. Her goal is to decelerate our rapid over-reliance on technology by compelling deliberate meditation upon technology’s benefits and downfalls on the circadian rhythm of all living species.

From Judith Present's On The Curve: Wolves and Peckers

From Judith Present’s On The Curve: Wolves and Peckers

Judith Present’s digital photography in the Arts Café Gallery deals with the deviation of the straight line to create movement from stagnation, to transform still images into dance by using curves, flow, and repetition. Present explains, “The beauty of working with digital photographs is that one can take a blank canvas on the computer and create just about anything, true or untrue, unlike capturing reality. Photographs used to be what the eye sees; now they can be what the eye can dream up and manipulate.”

Guanlao received her MFA in studio art from the University of New Mexico, and has exhibited in Maryland, California, Michigan, Florida, New Mexico, New Jersey, and New York. Artist’s website: www.eloisaguanlao.com.

Present’s work utilizes her background in fashion photography, textile design and theater. Currently based in Pennsylvania, she has exhibited in New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Montana. More about this artist at More about this artist at http://www.flickr.com/photos/presentarts

In the West Gallery, the 12th Annual TeensART Exhibit will celebrate the artwork of over 250 young artists throughout the Central New York community. Curated by art teachers from ten area schools, the gallery walls come alive with the amazing creativity of young artists. This exhibit is generously sponsored again this year by Tom Morris, DMD, of Family Dentistry in Norwich.

A reception for the artists will be held on Saturday, March 19, from 12-3 pm. The exhibits run through April 30. Gallery hours are 10-5 Tuesday-Friday and 12-3 on Saturdays. Admission is free, and the Galleries are wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift. For more information, call 315-691-3550 or visit http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Earlville Galleries are located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

Exhibits are made possible, in part, with public funds from the NYS Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

The wet collodion glass ambrotypes capture images of “stuffed” birds endemic to the southeast region of the United States which, as a cultural material form, compel deliberate meditation upon the benefits and pitfalls of technology on the circadian rhythm of living species. They are housed in stylized view cameras, harkening to the early days of field photography. The ambrotypes of “stuffed” birds perch as poignant, but pale souvenirs of real birds migrating over real places.

The wet collodion glass ambrotypes capture images of “stuffed” birds endemic to the southeast region of the United States which, as a cultural material form, compel deliberate meditation upon the benefits and pitfalls of technology on the circadian rhythm of living species. They are housed in stylized view cameras, harkening to the early days of field photography. The ambrotypes of “stuffed” birds perch as poignant, but pale souvenirs of real birds migrating over real places. (Eloisa Guanlao)

This series deals with the deviation of the straight line to create movement from stagnation. Using curves and their flow, images are transformed into dance.

This series deals with the deviation of the straight line to create movement from stagnation. Using curves and their flow, images are transformed into dance. (Judith Present)

The Earlville Galleries will celebrate the amazing artwork of young artists in the Central New York community with its 12th Annual TeensART Exhibit, generously sponsored this year by Tom Morris DMD of Family Dentistry in Norwich. A reception for the artists, their teachers, friends and families will be held on Saturday, March 19, from 12-3 pm.

16TeensARTcelebration postcard webThe exhibit showcases the artwork of students in grades 6 of 12 from eleven participating schools this year. This year’s teachers who will curate the work of their students for participation in the exhibit will be: Julie Frear and Adam Reynolds of Cazenovia, Ashley Stagner of Hamilton, Micheal Flint of Madison, Karin Howlett of Morrisville-Eaton H, Jon Vaughn of New Hartford Senior High, Laurie Clark of New Life Christian, Barbara Dwyer and Wayne Franklin of Norwich HS, Matt Wilson of Norwich Middle School, Heather Cigeroglu of Oneida High, Jackie Craine and Kristian Newman of Sherburne-Earlville, Tresta Smith and Linda Salta of Unadilla Valley and Mary Beth McGuire of Waterville HS.

Come and vote for best of show! The top three artists garnering the most votes will receive prizes donated by Golden Artist Colors.

Eloisa Guanlao and Judith Present exhibits will coincide with TeensART 2016

Eloisa Guanlao and Judith Present exhibits will coincide with TeensART 2016

Two other exhibits will also be on display at the Earlville Galleries: DARWIN’S FINCHES by Eloisa Guanlao in the East Gallery asks: Who benefits when technology expands and natural resources are consumed? Who suffers? What could we gain, as a society, from scrutinizing the impact of technological innovation? These questions and more form the nexus of Eloisa Guanlao’s exhibition DARWIN’S FINCHES, which juxtaposes photographs of live and expired birds alongside Smartphone “measuring rulers” to create ambrotypes– literal fossilized records of the bird’s existence and a reminder of the myopia of 19th century positivist science.

ON THE CURVE by Judith Present in the Arts Cafe Gallery his series deals with the deviation of the straight line, to create movement where once there was stagnation. Using different curves and the way they flow I have transformed the images into dances. All three exhibits will run through April 30.

The Earlville Galleries are part of the Earlville Opera House, located at 18 East Main Street in Earlville. Gallery hours are 10-5 Tues-Fri and 12-3 on Saturdays.   The Earlville Galleries are wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift, and admission is free.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the NYS Council on the Arts with the support of Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

Kayleigh DiMare, 20th Grade, Waterville High School

Kayleigh DiMare, 10th Grade, Waterville High School

 

Shayla Sullivan, Grade Sheburne-Earlville12, High School

Shayla Sullivan, Grade Sheburne-Earlville12, High School

Version 3The Earlville Opera House welcomes Americana standouts Mike + Ruthy with their new band on Friday, March 11th at 8 pm. Folks may remember their previous band The Mammals! Their concerts dance from Americana ho-downs to sassy blues, Motown soul, old-timey harmonies, rock-n-roll energy and infectious, inspired songwriting.

Their debut album, Bright as You Can, was released 9 months ago and top critics had this to say: “One of the year’s standout Americana albums” (Boston Globe), “In the vanguard of today’s vibrant folk revival” (Pop Matters), “honoring the great musical traditions of the past while at the same time welcoming, with open arms, the future of what music can be” (Folk Alley), and much, much more.

MRBGilnTouchedBW

Mike + Ruthy Band with Jacob Silver, Konrad Meissner, Mike Merenda, Ruthy Ungar, and Charlie Rose

The Mike + Ruthy Band are Mike Merenda (vocals, guitar), Ruthy Ungar (vocals, fiddle, banjo), Jacob Silver (bass), Charlie Rose (pedal steel) and Konrad Meissner (drums). “They play with jubilation–as exciting and powerful as any quintet out there, mixing up fiddle and banjo with drums, bass, pedal steel and organ. Besides Ruth Ungar’s amazing voice, the lyrics on this album are incredibly thoughtful — they’re carefully crafted, without a word or phrase out of place. From rollicking good times to more tender reflections, Bright As You Can is a winner.” (Elena See)

Join us for a hot night of Americana with the Mike and Ruthy Band in the Arts Café on March 11th! Seating is limited. Admission is $22 and $20 for EOH members and students are discounted to $11. The Earlville Opera House is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.

Don’t forget to visit our Artisan’s Gift Shop featuring over 35 regional artists with jewelry to blown glass to pottery. The EOH Arts Café will open one hour before the performance and serves tasty desserts and hot coffee/tea.
More news about the upcoming Summer Season is appearing online every day! For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

Rock on Little Jane 

Bright As You Can 

Chasin’ Gold 

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

ShrewJay by Alli Grim

ShrewJay by Alli Grim

The Earlville Galleries start the year with three new exhibits opening on Sat, January 30th!

East Gallery: In “Nestlings,” Hamilton artist Allison Amann Grim creates hybrid creatures from imaginary worlds that are combinations of two or more animals. She tries to capture them in a moment in time, like something out of a museum…where would they live, what would they eat, what sorts of plants and animals would coexist with them? The creatures come into being with polymer clay, glass, taxidermy elements, natural and man made objects.

Grim says that her “work revolves around the fragility of life, a glimpse of a moment caught in time, catching it and putting it under glass…I like the idea of being able to peek into a mini world. The ideas that have been rattling around in my brain are set free to transform as others interpret them in their own minds. I am inspired by Darwin’s theory of evolution, how species can change and evolve to meet the needs of their changing environment.”

Tiny House in the Big Woods by Maria Brockmann of the Main View Gallery Artists Group

Tiny House in the Big Woods by Maria Brockmann of the Main View Gallery Artists Group

Arts Café Gallery: Oneonta’s Main View Gallery exhibits a traveling group show exploring the work of artists with intellectual disabilities. They ask: How do we define ourselves? Do we accept someone else’s categorization of who we are, or do we strive to determine our own designations based on who we love, how we live, and what we create? For artists with intellectual disabilities, these questions can be especially confounding. They may spend most of their lives dealing with the label of “disabled” placed on them by the outer world, feeling the stigma of being different. At Oneonta’s Main View Gallery, these artists are given the freedom to define themselves by their abilities. A program of the Arc Otsego, the gallery has provided these artists with an opportunity to show and sell the works they create through the Arc’s rich creative arts programming that features painting, sculpture, writing, drumming, acting, movement, and singing. Come enjoy the beautiful, compelling works these artists have created in a special artist group exhibit at the Earlville Galleries.

Nearly 300 young artists will be on display at KidsART 2016

Nearly 300 young artists will be on display at KidsART2016

West Gallery: The 23rd Annual KidsART Exhibit features the amazing work of students from kindergarten through sixth grade. Collaborating with art teachers from several elementary schools in Central New York, the exhibit celebrates the freedom of expression and incomparable joy that comes so readily from young children. The exhibit typically draws more than 600 people over the course of the show and is a unique opportunity for children throughout the region to display their work in a professional gallery, and for the community at large to see the fine quality art these young people are capable of.

Don’t miss the opening party for the artists and their teachers, friends, and family with loads of cookies, chocolate, gummy worms and more from 12-3 pm on Saturday, January 30.

This year the schools below have confirmed that they will be sending work for the exhibit.

Burton St. Elementary School, Cazenovia, Gibson Primary School (Norwich), Hamilton Central School, Madison Central School, Memorial Park Elementary (Waterville), Morrisville Eaton Central School, New Life Christian School, Norwich Middle School, Perry Brown Elementary School (Norwich), Sherburne-Earlville Central School, Stockbridge Valley Central School, and Unadilla Valley Central School

Opening receptions for all the artists will be held on January 30 from 12-3pm with light refreshments. All three exhibits will run through March 12. Gallery hours are 10-5 Tuesday-Friday and 12-3 on Saturdays. Admission is free, and the EOH is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift. For more information, call 315-691-3550 or visit http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

The Honeycutters from Ashville, NC are touring in support of their new CD

The Honeycutters from Ashville, NC are touring in support of their new CD

It’s honest. It’s rockin’. It’s part hope, part chagrin, and it’s coming to the Earlville Opera House Saturday, November 21st at 8pm. The Honeycutters are exactly what their name implies: an act merging the tender edge of country sweetness with boot-scooting honky-tonk swagger, fleshed out with upright bass, mandolin, and Amanda Anne Platt’s incredible vocals. “Their music embodies a very catchy, accessible, optimistic sort of spirit so frequently lacking in folk circles,” offers Folk Music About.com’s Kim Ruehl. “What’s more, they’re a great band replete with tasty harmonies.”

As with the very best in roots music acts, however, it’s more than The Honeycutters’ sound that sets them apart. Platt, who got the band together in 2007 and actually hails from the Saratoga, NY, area, is a talented songwriter whose sweet vocals have been compared to Gillian Welch, Mary Chapin Carpenter, and Loretta Lynn. In the title track from the band’s latest release, Me Oh My, set free in April of this year, Platt embraces the persona of a broken woman intent on standing on her own two feet: I had a baby but the good lord took her, she was an angel but her wings were crooked, guess he figured he could love her better than me. Now preacher’s talking about the bed I made, says I’m too old to be chasing trains, he says I’ve got to lay it down and let it be.

Calling Asheville, North Carolina home, The Honeycutters have shared the stage with the likes of Guy Clark, Tony Rice, Billy Joe Shaver, and the Steep Canyon Rangers. “Today’s Smoky Mountain area modern folk thing does have a certain vibe, and these guys are among its finest purveyors,” notes Music City Roots’ Craig Havighurst. As their fan base continues to grow, Me Oh My serves as a record of a band on the very verge of hitting the big time.

The Honeycutters are touring in support of their new CD.

The Honeycutters are touring in support of their new CD.

Here’s an excerpt from Steve Ramm writing about the band’s newest CD: “Country? Bluegrass? Americana? This group fills all those genres in an album I can’t stop playing...I can’t, for the life of me, understand why I haven’t posted a review of this fabulous new CD from the Asheville, NC-based quintet, The Honeycutters, yet, here on Amazon. I’ve had it for over a month (I received an advance copy from their label) and I must play it a few times a week. It’s that good! But, I’ll rectify my oversight and get this review up now.

“Like another favorite Americana/bluegrass/country band, The Hot Club of Cowtown, the Honeycutters are led by a woman who can write great songs. Guitarist Amanda Anne Platt – a founding member, wrote all 14 songs on this CD and sings lead vocal too. From the first track – “Jukebox” – to the closer (“A Life For You”) this is a perfect album of tunes that – in most cases will have you dancing around the room (or at least tapping yiur toes). There are songs here (“Hearts of Men”) that sound “familiar” (in a good sort of way) but which are newly composed. With pedal steel, dobro and bass, the group is based in country/bluegrass. But they embellish the music with guests playing organ, harmonica, and even trumpet, on some of the tracks…”

Join us for an evening with The Honeycutters this Saturday, November 21st!   Seating is limited. Admission is $20 and $18 for EOH members and students are discounted to $15. The Earlville Opera House is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.   Don’t forget to visit our Artisan’s Gift Shop featuring over 35 regional artists with jewelry to blown glass to pottery. The EOH Arts Café will open one hour before the performance and serves tasty desserts and hot coffee/tea.

For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY. If you’re of the social media persuasion, don’t forget to check out the Earlville Opera House on Facebook and Twitter!

More about The Honeycutters:  http://www.honeycutters.com

You Tube: 

You Tube: 

You Tube: 

Here’s what people are saying…

“I can see a day when her name is mentioned alongside Lucinda Williams, Mary Gauthier, and Gillian Welch.” –The Real Southern

“Platt’s songs are exceptional, with interesting melodies and well-written lyrics sung with a strong and engaging voice that sounds a bit like a blend of Gillian Welch and Loretta Lynn.” -Michael Colby, Review in No Depression/Palms Playhouse, Winters, CA

“Vocalist Amanda Anne Platt has an innate ability to write relatable, straightforward, and authentic lyrics.” – TheDailyCountry.com

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

Sylvia de Swaan: The Landscape of Memory series: "The War Game"

Sylvia de Swaan: The Landscape of Memory series: “The War Game”

On Saturday November 7th, two artists exploring the range of emotions that can be conveyed through photographs will bring their work to the Earlville Galleries. Sylvia de Swaan explores themes of heritage, nostalgia, and identity, often using old photographs or maps in the starkly beautiful black and white works she creates. By contrast, Sherburne, NY-based photographer Wells Horton’s work deftly captures the rich colors of our area’s most impressive and iconic scenery, from waterfalls, streams, and rivers to old barns and rolling farmland.

De Swaan, who was born in Romania, has also lived and worked in Mexico and the United States. A haunting awareness of the past, and of loss, seems to resonate in many of her works, as she juxtaposes cultural and religious objects with images of history, travel, and transition. This show, titled Narratives, is no exception. “My work explores themes of individual and collective memory and identity, the state of the world and the neighborhood where I live,” offers de Swaan. “I’m interested in the layers of history that coexist in the present, and the lines of destiny that determine where we’re from and who we become.”

Chenango River at Williams Road, by Wells Horton

Chenango River at Williams Road, by Wells Horton

A central New York “lifer,” Wells Horton thrills in the ever-changing palette made fresh each day as the upstate seasons fade one into the other. As the deep greens of late summer mature into the golds, oranges, and russet hues of fall, and foggy mornings lend emotion, we celebrate the explosive colors even as we feel the oncoming winter, which provides its own enduring lesson in appreciating a stark crystalline landscape filled with many shades of gray and brown. “My mission is to allow one to take in the circle of color surrounding us,” writes Horton. His show, titled The Seasonal Beauty of Central New York, succeeds on many levels.  As he put the show together, he focused the inclusion of works that are all within 10 miles of the Earlville Opera House…he’ll include a map with the show to show where the images came from!

While beautiful and evocative photographs fill the walls of our East Gallery and Arts Café, our West Gallery will feature the works and wares of over 65 regional artists showing a range of handmade goods, including pottery, soaps, baskets, candles, jewelry, and more! Don’t miss this opportunity to get your holiday shopping taken care of the artful, locally-sourced way. The Holiday Artists Sale will begin Friday, November 20th, at 10am, and run every Friday, Saturday and Sunday until Christmas.

A reception for the artists will be held on Saturday, November 7th from 12 – 3pm, and the exhibits will run through December 20th. Gallery hours are 10-5 Tuesday-Friday and 12-3 on Saturdays. Admission is free, and the Galleries are wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift. For more information, call 315-691-3550 or visit www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Earlville Galleries are located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

The upcoming exhibits open with a reception this Saturday, Nov 7 from noon to 3 pm

The upcoming exhibits open with a reception this Saturday, Nov 7 from noon to 3 pm

Exhibits are made possible, in part, with public funds from the NYS Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the NYS Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

“One of the top bluegrass singer-songwriters of his generation.” – Terry Gross, NPR's Fresh Air.

“One of the top bluegrass singer-songwriters of his generation.” – Terry Gross, NPR’s Fresh Air.

Peter Rowan may have gotten his start as one of Bill Monroe‘s Bluegrass Boys, in 1965, but in the 50 years since, he’s gone on to forge his own sub-genre of the bluegrass discipline. At a recent show, in between wheeling out the well-known classics “Panama Red” and “Midnight, Moonlight,” he sang tunes from his recent album Dharma Blues. Says Rowan, of his latest project, “These songs…are a place on the spiritual journey where the commitment has been made, the intent established, and the journey begun. The doubts and resolutions of the spiritual journey are what drives Dharma Blues….”  All Music.com opines: “Dharma Blues, for all the wily chances it takes, is a jewel, finding the artist at another creative peak.

Probably best known for founding Old & In the Way alongside David Grisman and Jerry Garcia, Rowan was quick to leave traditional bluegrass subject matter behind (while keeping instrumentation and song structure intact) as he broke ground with the quintet during the 1970s, taking a looser, more jam-based approach to bluegrass.

You Tubes of Peter Rowan

Rowan’s unbound talent has allowed him a wide range of exploration in the folk-bluegrass genre.  “Since then he’s done reggae-billy, southwestern yodeling, traditional bluegrass, singer-songwriter material, “flexigrass,” country, Texas swing, a tribute to Gene Autry and extended jam sets with seemingly anyone who would have him,” writes Glen Herbert of radio station KDHX. And yet his picking, and his clear high, lonesome singing voice remains as unimpeachable as ever.

“…The doubts and resolutions of the spiritual journey are what drives Dharma Blues….” That’s dead on, but it doesn’t touch the musical reach on this fine album. Some of these tunes have been part of Rowan’s live repertoire for years. In his painting studio in 2006, he played them for producer John Chelew and the pair began to conceive a recording.” AllMusic.com

Don’t miss an evening with a true legend on Saturday, September 19th, at 8pm. Admission is $35 for nonmembers, $33 for members, and students are discounted to $30. Premium pricing applies for the front-most four rows. The Earlville Opera House is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.

Don’t forget to visit our three Earlville Galleries with three new exhibits opening at 6 pm by Andrea Porter, Vartan Poghosian and Rebecca Murtaugh. The Artisans’ Gift Shop features over 35 regional artists showcasing everything from jewelry to blown glass to pottery. The EOH Arts Café will open one hour before the performance, serving freshly baked desserts and hot coffee and tea.

For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

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