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Somebody said to me, "Gilbert and Sullivan has to be done by the book.

But what a collection of talent. Our music director John Krause brought in some people he’s used to working with, I brought in others, and we all mixed with a bunch that have been singing Gilbert & Sullivan at Earlville for years.

We’re about midway into The Mikado now, and I’ve gone through most of the stages of directing: optimism, exasperation, depression and exhaustion. These are not linear – sometimes all four come during the same day. (I’m still waiting for euphoria.) A director needs to be an organizer, cheerleader, sounding board, sometimes a tyrant.

Scheduling can be a nightmare, taking into account vacations, rehearsal locations, and which scenes need to be rehearsed on a given night. For The Mikado, we have singers coming from the Mohawk Valley region, Syracuse, and from Clarks Summit, PA. I almost lost it when somebody said, “Please let me know the exact time I will be used at each rehearsal. I don’t need to sit around for 45 minutes listening to other people when I could be home finishing my dinner.” A fair request, except the person had only been called for two rehearsals at that point. Another asked to be excused from Monday and Tuesday rehearsals: “I didn’t expect we’d be working so many weeknights.”

But what a collection of talent. Our music director John Krause brought in some people he’s used to working with, I brought in others, and we all mixed with a bunch that have been singing Gilbert & Sullivan at Earlville for years. Whenever we’ve had the big group together, it has been striking how well everyone seems to get along. There is none of the diva attitude – “I’m the best.” Instead, most of them bend over backward to insist somebody else puts them to shame.

Theater poster for The Mikado

Theater poster for The Mikado

I came to this production a Gilbert & Sullivan virgin. I knew them by reputation and by their influence on so many things I love, but I’d never seen a live show. Recordings rarely do them justice – the words muddle together and the chorus seems miles away. To hear G&S live, with singers invested in creating distinct characters, is a treat. The wordplay and the melodies in perfect synch, songs instantly recognizable because they’ve long been assimilated into popular culture.

Somebody said to me, “Gilbert and Sullivan has to be done by the book. Gilbert insisted that performers do things exactly his way. Who are you to change it?” True enough. W.S. Gilbert was a genius and a difficult man – he and Arthur Sullivan rarely got along. Gilbert loved to torment performers, even months after a show had opened. He was argumentative and litigious. One of Gilbert’s favorite refrains was, “I will refer this matter to my solicitor.” Sullivan was accommodating. He loved good food and drink, and regularly indulged in prostitutes. Gilbert would write the words and send them on to Sullivan, who had an uncanny knack for the perfect musical complement. (Although Sullivan was knighted long before Gilbert, critics regarded him as wasted potential – the light comedies he remains known for were equivalent to modern-day sitcoms.)

Ulmar next was hired to play Yum-Yum in the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company's first American production of The Mikado, at the Fifth Avenue Theatre in New York, from 1885 to 1886.

Geraldine Ulmar played Yum-Yum in the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company’s first American production of The Mikado.

History: The Mikado happened when the Gilbert & Sullivan partnership seemed on the brink of ending. They were under contract to the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company, which had been created to exclusively produce their works. Sales for Princess Ida (1884) were slowing, and Richard D’Oyly Carte requested a new piece, contractually required within six months of the notice. Gilbert had long been toying with a plot about a “magic lozenge,” which would make a good man bad, an honest man a liar, a virtuous woman a whore, etc. Sullivan hated the idea, and pronounced their partnership finished. Legend has it that while Gilbert sat in his study, a ceremonial Japanese sword fell from its mounting on the wall, and The Mikado burst into his mind fully formed. He sent the outline to Sullivan, who replied, “As I don’t see any mention of a magic lozenge, I’m your man.” It’s a good story. The Mikado is set in Japan but remains quintessentially English. The “exotic” setting allowed Gilbert to more effectively satirize the politics and customs of his native England. It has been noted that not a single plot point or joke really applies to Japan at all, but every one applies perfectly to England. The exotic setting is merely a disguise, although it often remains lost on the audience. (When she saw the original production, the Queen of England remarked, “It’s all a bit silly, isn’t it?”)

The piece quickly became Gilbert & Sullivan’s most popular operetta. Copyright law at the time was weak – although competing companies weren’t allowed to use the original printed scores, they were free to transcribe them from memory. At every performance, agent musicians would listen in the audience and later write down what they’d heard. Gilbert knew they had to get the jump on an American production, so he took extreme measures. First, he ordered the D’Oyly Carte company to buy all of the silk from all the suppliers they knew of, to prevent rival companies from making costumes. Second, he arranged a touring company and had the performers and musicians sign non-disclosure agreements; they got on a boat for New York at midnight and weren’t allowed to say goodbye to friends before they left. A Broadway theater was booked under a false name, and the “official” Gilbert & Sullivan Mikado managed to open weeks ahead of the knockoff competition. By some estimates, The Mikado has never not been in production, somewhere in the world. Art cries out to be reinterpreted.

This is what we bring to contemporary audiences – an outline that bears a fresh creative stamp. I told my performers (they are certainly “my” performers – let nobody criticize or attempt to bring them down) that they are responsible for creating a character. The formula is something like 30% script/60% actor/10% director. I will shape what they offer into a cohesive story. We’ve learned the music. Now we’re at the point where we’re building the story and scenario. I hoped you stay tuned, because it’s going to be good.

To find out more about the production and to get tickets: http://bit.ly/WSKU1Y

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In Brazil, Matuto is slang for Country Boy, but this NYC based group of urbanized virtuosos is emerging as one of the world’s hottest international touring acts.  Recently awarded the title of “American Musical Ambassadors” by the U.S. State Department, Matuto has been hailed as "seductively cross cultural" by the Chicago Tribune, and praised by the Sun Times as "the height of world music sophistication.”  As another critic recently admired, "there is without a doubt nothing else out there like it."

In Brazil, Matuto is slang for Country Boy, but this NYC based group of urbanized virtuosos is emerging as one of the world’s hottest international touring acts. Recently awarded the title of “American Musical Ambassadors” by the U.S. State Department, Matuto has been hailed as “seductively cross cultural” by the Chicago Tribune, and praised by the Sun Times as “the height of world music sophistication.” As another critic recently admired, “there is without a doubt nothing else out there like it.”

This Thursday, July 31st at 7 pm imagine the sound of a Brazilian Carnival in the Appalachian Mountains on the village green in Hamilton!  A sound where dynamic percussion instruments rumble beneath blues drenched vocals, telecaster twangs, accordion acrobatics, and folksy fiddle tunes.  Matuto (“bumpkin” in Brazilian slang) moves with two-stepping grace between bluegrass and forró, between swamp rock and maracatu, between surf guitar shimmies and the wah-wah of the berimbau.

Matuto’s songs can sway hips just as easily as spark insights. Drawing on Brazil’s folkloric rhythms like forró and coco, and on deep Americana—from bluegrass to spirituals to swamp jams—Matuto uses unexpected Pan-American sonic sympathies to craft appealing, roosty, yet philosophical tales of love, self-discovery, and true peace.

Matuto, who call themselves a Brazilian Carnival in the Appalachian Mountains, to our community this summer and again next May.
Their first concert will highlight Brazilian Folk Music:
Brazilian musical styles like Bossa Nova, Samba, and Choro have made huge impressions on the American musical landscape for decades, but there is much more to be gleaned from this culturally rich and dynamic country. The members of Matuto have spent decades mastering the folkloric styles of the Brazilian Northeast, where Rabecas (Brazilian Fiddle), Accordions, and polyrhythmic percussion instruments reign supreme. In this concert we’ll explore styles like forró, xoté, maracatu, and arrasta pé with an in-depth look at the rhythms, melodies, and cultural influences that make up this infectious and universally appealing dance music.
The Devil and The Diamond was released May 2014...“The devil is what’s keeping us from our best selves, which is the diamond we have the potential to become,” Ross explains, spinning the narrative thread that ties the album’s pieces together. “That tension exists in all of us and in a loose way, this album outlines the journey we take, when we wrestle with the devil and find the diamond.”

The Devil and The Diamond was released May 2014…“The devil is what’s keeping us from our best selves, which is the diamond we have the potential to become,” Ross explains, spinning the narrative thread that ties the album’s pieces together. “That tension exists in all of us and in a loose way, this album outlines the journey we take, when we wrestle with the devil and find the diamond.”

This is from the band’s bio:  Matuto has just released a new record out this spring so the concert will also feature selections from their new work.  “…The rolling drums and quicksilver accordion licks, the earthy vibe and thoughtful reflections mingle on Matuto’s latest refinement of their Appalachia-gone-Afro-Brazilian sound, The Devil and The Diamond (Motema Music; release: May 14, 2013).

Here’s what the press is saying:

“The joyous, ebullient music of Matuto merges the forró folkloric music of Brazil with the sounds of all-American bluegrass.  Violin, accordion, and a range of Brazilian percussion give this band, founded by South Carolina native Clay Ross, a seductively cross-cultural appeal.” – Chicago Tribune

“The accordion will make you want to throw salt on your hardwood floors and two-step with someone.” – The Examiner

“While many bands attempt ambitious fusion projects, few succeed in such an authentic way.” – RootsWorld

“The sound resulting from Matuto’s lab is a mature blend which seems to expand and update the musical legacy of MPB (Música Popular Brasileria), refreshing the relationship that for so many decades has existed between U.S. American folk musics and Brazil’s own musical heritage.” – Black Grooves

“These engaging Brazilian Forró rockers borrow from jazz and funk in their lively sets.” – New York Times
This tour of the Matuto is made possible by a grant from Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support for the National Endowment for the Arts!

Enjoy an evening of music and creativity in a beautiful park setting!  Come early with a picnic, or check out the local eateries. Bring a blanket or lawn chair. FREE!

The Hamilton Village Music Series runs every Thursday until August 14th.at 7:00 pm on the Hamilton Village Green. Rain Location is the Colgate Inn (Payne St). No tickets necessary for this free event.

This series is funded by the Village of Hamilton, and was made possible in part with funds from the Decentralization Program, a regrant program of the NYS Council on the Arts, administered by Cultural Resources Council and co-presented by the Earlville Opera House.

For more information about the location if it is raining on the day of the show call (315) 691- 3550.

fanOften considered the most-performed musical theater piece in history! The Mikado comes to the historic stage of the Earlville Opera House this August 8, 9 and 10. The Mikado; or, The Town of Titipu is a ROMANTIC MUSICAL COMEDY in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It’s about the son of the Mikado of Japan, who has fallen for a girl who is engaged to her guardian.  He hides his true identity to follow the girl to Titipu and gets caught up in a topsy turvy political intrigue that borders on the ridiculous.

HERE ARE THE DIRECTORS:

Director Chris Bord
Chris recently directed the musical I Love You Because, in February 2014.  He’s incredibly proud of this Mikado cast – break a leg!

Music Director John Krause
John has participated in hundreds of musical productions over the years, including many G&S pieces.  By day, he teaches music at Herkimer Central Schools.

Stage Manager Sarah Bord
Sarah recently stage managed A Dancer’s Journey for MV Ballet, and hopes to become a professional stage manager. She thanks her theater family for their support.

3168167HERE’S THE CAST...
The Mikado of Japan Craig Risser
Craig has sung the chorus of 39 operas, most recently L’Elisir d’amore with West Bay Opera in Palo Alto CA, 8 principal roles in G&S operettas and 17 years with Schola Cantorum.

Nanki-Poo, His Son, disguised as a wandering minstrel and in love with Yum-Yum Ben Stovall
Ben is a rising sophomore at Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute, majoring in chemistry and minoring in musical performance. This is his first G&S production and he is very excited.

Ko-Ko,The Lord High Executioner of Titipu Steve Scheinman
Steve is a perennial EOH Savoyard since 1985.  He’s been the Lord Chancellor, the Captain of the Pinafore, the Duke of Plaza-Toro, and the Major-General (twice!), among others.

Pooh-Bah, Lord High Everything Else Thom Capozzella
Thom has performed in Ruddigore (Robin/Ruthvern) and The Mikado (Pish-Tush) in addition to directing and/or acting in many other shows in CNY.

Pish-Tush, A Noble Lord Buff Lingo
Past G&S performances for Buff include The Pirates of Penzance, The Mikado, H.M.S. Pinafore, Trial by Jury, Ruddigore, and The Gondoliers.

the-mikadaYum-Yum, A Ward of Ko-Ko, also engaged to Ko-Ko Janet Engle
Janet Engle is from Clinton.  She was recently in I Love You Because and Tommy, and is honored to be joining the history of performances at EOH!

Pitti-Sing, A Ward of Ko-Ko Sarah Hasegawa
Sarah’s past EOH credits include Lady Sangazure in The Sorcerer, Ruth in The Pirates of Penzance and Casilda in The Gondoliers.

Peep-Bo, A Ward of Ko-Ko Heather Bagnall
Heather has been a part of the EOH G&S performances since 1990 as both cast member & costume designer.  Thank you to the wonderful cast!

Katisha, An elderly lady, in love with Nanki-Poo Lisa Jones
Lisa is a soprano who performs in the Utica/Rome area. She is excited to portray Katisha in her first EOH production. Thanks for the opportunity!

Chorus: Maid Miranda Riley
Miranda is an EOH veteran with many G&S operettas in her resume.  She is a student at Clinton HS, where she also performs.

Chorus: Nobleman Joe Caruso
After 12 years, Joe returned to the stage (Utica) last fall for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Our Town.

Chorus: Nobleman Robert Christman
Normally, Robert mostly performs in front of college psychology students.  This is his first time on a non-academic stage!

Chorus: Nobleman Nick Williams
Nick is a frequent performer on area stages.  Most recently, he appeared in the musical 9 to 5 for Rome Capitol Summerstage.

Chorus: Nobleman Griffin Bagnall-Shenkel
Griffin has sung in 12 shows & sings in the Hamilton College Masterworks Choral.  Has participated in EOH G&S productions since he was 5. He is a high school freshman.

Chorus: Nobleman Tyler Bagnall-Shenkel
Tyler began singing for the EOH G&S productions when he was 5, sings with the Hamilton College Masterworks Choral, and has sung in 9 shows. Tyler is in 7th grade.

Chorus: Nobleman Joseph Bagnall
Joseph Bagnall is in 6th grade and is making his stage debut.  Joe plays trumpet in school and is having a great time with the Mikado.

Rehearsals for the Mikado are going on in Utica and at the EOH.

Rehearsals for the Mikado are going on in Utica and at the EOH.

 Come see the production at the Earlville Opera House!

Summer Eat Out for the ARTS at Seven Oaks Benefiting the EOH

Tired of cooking? Want to meet some friends for supper?
Eat Out for the ARTS this Monday, August 4th, at the Seven Oaks Clubhouse.
Anytime between 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.

To whet your appetite visit http://www.sevenoaksclubhouse.com/Menu.html.

Good news! The Seven Oaks Clubhouse has generously offered to donate some of the proceeds from everyone who eats at the restaurant on Monday, August 4th to the EOH Arts Center.  They are a locally owned and operated full-service restaurant and caterer. We are open to the public and open year round serving an elegant but casual lunch and dinner. In the heart of a beautiful golf course with ample on-site parking, we offer gorgeous views from our dining room and patio year round.
Our motto is “Real Food Done Right.” At the Clubhouse all food is made to order using the freshest produce, meat, and seafood. We make all our own soups, sauces, dressings, and desserts, and in-house roast all our turkey, ham and beef. Vegetarians, vegans, and people with food allergies are happily accommodated.
So come try the casual elegance of the Seven Oaks Clubhouse and enjoy our warm and relaxed atmosphere. We are great for groups and offer a catering menu for larger occasions. Kids are welcome too, so bring the whole family.
Two guitar virtuoso pickin' a wild night of bluegrass!

Two guitar virtuoso pickin’ for a wild night of bluegrass!

To add to the fun on August 4th, EOH will be giving away 3 pairs of tickets to the Bluegrass concert with Chris Eldridge (Punch Brothers) and Julian Lage on August 16; the Howlin’ Brothers from Nashville will be opening!  Each set of concert tickets is valued at $40.  Seven Oaks will award them to the top three “eaters” on August 4th with the biggest checks for the evening so bring your friends and your appetites so that your table is a winner!

To add to the fun on Monday, August 4th, EOH will be giving away 3 pairs of tickets to the Bluegrass concert with Chris Eldridge (Punch Brothers) and Julian Lage on August 16; the Howlin’ Brothers from Nashville will be opening!  Each set of concert tickets is valued at $40.  Seven Oaks will award the sets of tickets to the top three “eaters” on Monday night.  So bring your friends and your appetites so that your table is a winner!

More about the prize tickets…An evening of pickin and bluegrass with child prodigy and “a giant in the making” (All About Jazz), Julian Lage joins guitars with Chris Eldridge of the Punch Brothers and The Infamous Stringdusters for this special performance on August 16th.  Chris “Critter” Eldridge and Julian Lage are, quite simply, two of the most important young guitarists performing today!

Opening act:
The Howlin’ Brothers are a three-piece string band that brings heart and passion into every performance. Their upbeat shows are heavy with original and traditional music, featuring the sounds of slide banjo, harmonica and old-time fiddle.
Sponsored by Seven Oaks Clubhouse Restaurant, Hamilton, NY and Media Sponsor WAER FM 88.3
seven oaks

The Seven Oaks Clubhouse Restaurant with sandwiches and entrees made with fresh, natural ingredients. Delicious grilled healthy choices!

Seven Oaks Clubhouse

2 East Lake Rd (Corner of Payne St & East Lake Rd)
Hamilton NY 13346
315-824-4420
Helping to support the ARTS at the Earlville Opera House!

Inside and Outside Dining available!

Inside the Seven Oaks Dining Room

Inside the Seven Oaks Dining Room

On a summer evening, dining under the stars!

On a summer evening, dining under the stars!

The finale of the 2013 Circus!

The finale of the 2013 Circus!

The Earlville Awesome House still has room for sign ups in the EOH Circus!  (Rumors are not true that the Circus is full!) The weeklong EOH Circus workshop starts on Monday, July 28 teaching circus and performance skills, with an emphasis on positive youth development and team building.  The EOH Circus is sponsored by the Colgate Bookstore!

Who can resist the call of the greatest show on earth? This weeklong circus skills workshop culminates in a performance not to be missed! Children will learn juggling, trapeze, tightrope walking, tumbling, clowning skills, and other circus performance activities. Join the EOH Circus troupe for a week of fun and merriment with Jen Taylor!

The 2014 EOH Circus Workshop for kids Ages 6-13 runs Monday through Friday, 7/28 – 8/1 from 9am-3pm, daily then on Friday, August 1st, kids put on their really Big Show at 7pm.  This year’s EOH Circus theme is “Cirque de Shiny” because the World needs Shiny Things…and because Play is a Backdoor to Discipline!

2015 DATES FOR EOH CIRCUS: 7/27 – 7/31/2015 from 9am-3pm, daily then on Friday the 31st of July come to the really Big Show at 7 pm at the Earlville Awesome House!

Registration is limited to 30 students. Scholarship help is available.  The cost of the workshop is $285 or $265 for EOH members per child, which includes T-shirt (nonrefundable tuition/materials fee)  The Earlville Opera House (or Awesome House for kids) is located at 18 East Main Street in Earlville, located just off Route 12B.  For more information, please call (315) 691-3550.           Here are registration forms

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

It's great to be a kid this summer and learn to juggle!  Jen Taylor helps a young circus camper to get started with jugglingscarves.

It’s great to be a kid this summer and learn to juggle! Jen Taylor helps a young circus camper to get started with jugglingscarves.

It's great to be a kid this summer and learn trapeze!

It’s great to be a kid this summer and learn trapeze!

Learning trapeze!

Learning trapeze!

a loving celebration of tradition gives rise to a whole new adventure in music with a singular sound

A loving celebration of tradition gives rise to a whole new adventure in the blues…

“In the same way the Carolina Chocolate Drops have refreshed string-band and bluegrass music, HBO brings new colour to the blues….”  — Sunday Daily Express, UK

Heritage Blues Orchestra brings their award-winning blues to the historic main stage of the Earlville Opera House in their Quintet on Saturday, July 26th at 8 pm. The band won the 2013 Living Blues Critics Poll Award for Best Debut Album as well as nominations from the Blues Foundation in Memphis for both Best Album and Best Traditional Album for their album And Still I Rise. WAER FM generously sponsors this concert.

The group is driven by the powerful rhythms of Grammy-awarding winning blues drummer Kenny “Beedy Eyes” Smith; buttressed by the churning, precise and percussive rhythms of harmonica virtuoso, Frenchman Vincent Bucher. This combined with the collective history of Bill Sims, Chaney Sims and Junior Mack in jazz, R&B and gospel help articulate and underscore the band’s striking voice. At the heart of the group is a broad spectrum of the blues.

And Still I Rise, the debut album from the Heritage Blues Orchestra, whose ambitious name reflects its intention to make up-to-the-minute music that draws upon the glorious past of African-American genres. As the title suggests, the group rises to the occasion.” — NPR Music

“‘And Still I Rise‘ is, simply, one of the best and most sophisticated takes on traditional blues I’ve heard in a long time. Perhaps the most extraordinary thing about this album is that sounds so, well, classy without losing any of the necessary rough, authentic edge of the country blues, gospel, and spirituals that gave birth to modern blues and jazz…Don’t miss this one.” — Driftwood Magazine

The band has been called a “one-band blues festival.” Rich Ruoff explains, “Listen to their Grammy-nominated debut album And Still I Rise, or witness a live performance and you’ll recognize this group as something breathtakingly new even as they honor old African-American musical traditions. Heritage Blues Quintet delivers by serving up a compelling new take on America’s Blues legacy. This utterly contemporary group is digging into innovative musical territory and making a distinct contribution to the African-American musical canvas. The grit of low-down country and urban blues with the bold brass of New Orleans; the hand-clapping fervor of gospel…the haunting cries of work songs and pulsating drums that reach back to the real roots of it all. You’ll journey across the Middle Passage, be driven down Highway 49 from Clarksdale to New Orleans, go from chain gangs and juke joints to orchestra pits, church pews and even back porches…”

Music Man Blog gives a sense of their musicianship on And Still I Rise, “This may be a new CD for the Heritage Blues Orchestra but the sounds captured in this CD are a beautiful blend of old traditional blues with some sensational modern musical talents…Bill Sims Jr’s singing is outstanding throughout…The electric slide guitar work by Junior Mack is a good as it gets! Chaney Sims, daughter of Bill Sims Jr. sings with a reality of life experiences. Chaney has many versatile singing styles and she gets to express them all…”

Music Samples:

Clarksdale Moan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GeoZQMXKKE

Get Right Church: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhT-S1-Lzgw#t=12

Heritage Blues sampler: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fTFEwHSUcE#t=15

Joliet Bound (Trad.): http://vimeo.com/67119956

For those who love the blues comes an evening of deep appreciation, as “every musician participating in making this beautiful music is a master of the blues.” See the Heritage Blues in the amazing acoustics of the 1892 historic opera house. Tickets are $25, $23 EOH members, $20 students. Premium seating applies in the first 4 rows. The EOH Theater is wheelchair-accessible with a ramp and a lift.

"Joyous and fresh...an infectious, bold exploration of the blues, R&B, and Americana delivered with passion and soul." — about.com

“Joyous and fresh…an infectious, bold exploration of the blues, R&B, and Americana delivered with passion and soul.” — about.com

During your visit, there are three new stunning quilt exhibits in the Earlville Galleries, the Artisan’s Gift Shop features New York artists, and there are homemade desserts in the EOH Arts Café! Refreshments will be available before the show and during intermission, including hot and cold drinks. For more information, or to reserve your seats, call 315-691-3550 or order online at http://www.earlvilleoperahouse.com. The Opera House is located at 18 East Main Street, in Earlville, NY.

EOH events are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and through the generosity of EOH members.

john and cathy

The Cadleys of Fayetteville, appear on July 24th to help us celebrate NYS artists playing Folk and Bluegrass

On Thursday, July 24th we feature one of our area’s most popular bands, The Cadleys. John and Cathy Cadley are following in the tradition of great male-female duets like Ian & Sylvia and Emmylou Harris and Gram Parsons, they show how the simplicity of two voices and two acoustic instruments can produce powerful music.

Syracuse New Times review:  “The duo, accompanying themselves on guitars, with Cadley switching to mandolin from time to time, has an easy rapport that reveals much about their shared virtuosity and musical kinship. Although they have been performing together for less than a year, their considerable chops give the duo an effortless, tight sound.”

Their repertoire draws on the traditional bluegrass of Bill Monroe and the Stanley Brothers, the tight harmonies of the Louvin Brothers, the “new acoustic” sounds of Alison Krauss and Claire Lynch. John Cadley is a fine songwriter and the band includes their own originals, which have been recorded by national bluegrass artists such as Tony Trischka, Jim Hurst, and Missy Raines. As a songwriter, John has had the thrill of seeing his work taken to the national level when Lou Reid, with Vince Gill and Ricky Skaggs singing harmony, took John’s song, “Time,” to the #1 spot on the national bluegrass charts for three consecutive months. Cathy’s resume is equally impressive, including 21 years leading a church and gospel group in her hometown of Fayetteville, NY.

Their live concerts feature everything from traditional mountain ballads and bluegrass classics like “Bury Me Beneath the Willow” and “Blue and Lonesome,” to Alison Krauss’ “The Lucky One,” to the Louvin Brother’s “Cash on the Barrelhead.” And just to add a few surprises, you’ll also hear a great acoustic rendition of Paul McCartney’s “I Will,” a few of John’s originals from his Nashville-produced solo CD, The Closer I Get, and Cathy’s knockout version of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” For an evening of soulful duet singing and tasty picking on guitar and mandolin, the Cadleys are not to me missed.

But the real treats in this collection are Cadley’s own compositions, the wistful “Evening” and “It All Adds Up to You.” The latter, a simply gorgeous tune,…Cadley’s lyric, a kind of bittersweet ode to a long-suffering relationship, is the work of a first-rate wordsmith (“He says that you’re the reason/ He’s closed all the doors/ And he knows you’d call it treason/ but he don’t care no more.”)…”  Tammy DeDomenico – Syracuse NewTimes

Graceful songs with a strong bluegrass history, both old and new.

Graceful songs with a strong bluegrass history, both old and new.

More info on their website: http://cadleys.com/

You Tubes by the Cadleys:
Evening  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NrKKgFg6mw#t=11

Wild Lonesome Blues http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3eVMumZz2w#t=35

Enjoy an evening of music and creativity in a beautiful park setting!  Come early with a picnic, or check out the local eateries. Bring a blanket or lawn chair. FREE!

The Hamilton Village Music Series runs every Thursday until August 14th.at 7:00 pm on the Hamilton Village Green. Rain Location is the Colgate Inn (Payne St). No tickets necessary for this free event.

This series is funded by the Village of Hamilton, and was made possible in part with funds from the Decentralization Program, a regrant program of the NYS Council on the Arts, administered by Cultural Resources Council and co-presented by the Earlville Opera House.

For more information about the location if it is raining on the day of the show call (315) 691- 3550.

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